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Uncle Vanya Press

"Goat in the Road Productions establishes its own universe, creating a world of another time and place with its own distinct rules."  

-- Theodore Mahn, Times Picayune

 

"There are some extras to Goat in the Road's adaptation of Anton Chekhov’s Uncle Vanya, including an art installation by Momma Tried in an adjoining space in the Ether Dome. There’s also a Tour Guide’s intro to the play and some reading materials elaborating on the cast members’ probing of their satisfaction with life. But the production has no problem standing on its own, and under Christopher Kaminstein’s direction, it’s an engaging look at a group of twentysomethings figuring out the next steps in their lives...It’s not surprising to see such a mature and polished production from the young company, but it is exciting to see an engaging work about a generation that’s so often treated to flat or flimsy characterizations. It’s an impressive and distinct version of a play that’s often produced or adapted." 

-- Will Coviello, The Gambit

 

"Goat in the Road Productions’ adaptation of Uncle Vanya transforms Chekhov’s group of Russian peasants tasked with maintaining an ailing country estate into a batch of young professionals in the throes of existential crises. Uncle Vanya has many familiar millennial motifs: start-up culture, shifting career paths, queerness, longing. And the characters smoke a lot of pot. Momma Tried’s The Voynitsky Collection exists in richly detailed defiance of the banality of the characters’ life choices, and, together, the installation and the performance suggest a curiously modern paradox: that we believe our lives are fascinating, in all of their mind-boggling particulars, and worthy of documentation; and that purpose in life arises only from active engagement with life instead of passive spectating."

-- Brooke Schueller, Pelican Bomb